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Guidelines for Presenters

We are inviting nominated students, faculty, staff, and community partners to provide an overview of a 30-minute presentation or panel, or a 10-minute TEDtalk. Each will be offered up to twice during the day.

PLEASE NOTE:

1.    You will need to have a working camera and microphone, as well as reliable internet, in order to present.

2.    Also, your institution may have a media room that is set up to safely provide you a space to present to the conference attendees, should you need help with the appropriate technology and internet.

Guidelines

-Individual Presentations will be given by one student, staff member, faculty member, or community partner. Each presentation will take 30 minutes, including audience interaction or questions.

Consider these helpful guidelines

-Panels will be comprised of two to four people, which can include students, faculty, staff, and community partners. Each panel will take 30 minutes. including audience interaction or questions.

Consider these helpful guidelines

-TEDtalks will be given by one student, staff member, faculty member, or community partner. Each TEDtalk will take 10 minutes, with no planned Q&A. Consider these helpful guidelines

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Conference

Themes

Volunteering and community engagement during the time of Covid-19

While the need is great for volunteering and community engagement during Covid, so too are the barriers. Most community engagement is currently taking place in virtual settings, such as virtual tutoring, group projects completed over Zoom or Google Meets, or many other examples. Some students are missing out on the interpersonal interactions, while other students have found new opportunities to engage on a global level, albeit virtually. This is the space to tell your story or what you have been doing - why you felt it was important, what barriers were there, who is benefiting and how, and what can we learn about the role of virtual volunteering and community engagement for the future, even after we return in person in 2021?

Why we need to have healthy virtual and socially distanced connections

Social distancing, technology, and remote learning have protected us from inadvertently spreading the virus, along with other measures including wearing masks of course. That said, keeping people separated is not a natural human state – we crave relationships, human contact, empathy, and more in order to feel connected in our societies. 2020 have led us to feel burnout and isolation. This is the space to tell your story or experience of maintaining (or struggling to maintain) healthy virtual or socially distanced connections – why you felt it was important, what limitations there are through using technology, how you used technology or creative ways to maintain virtual or socially distanced connections, and what can we learn about the importance of maintaining connections to others for the future?

Ways to do virtual community engagement (VCE)

Students have been exploring, and have become quite experienced, at being virtually engaged with community partners locally, nationally and globally. Some VCE is done in groups, is project-based (with a specific outcome identified), is focused locally or on challenges elsewhere on the globe, enables collaboration across higher ed institutions, and much more. This is the space to raise everyone’s knowledge and awareness of the many creative and successful ways to be virtually community engaged.

Global virtual community engagement (VCE) opportunities

Again, students have discovered that there are in fact many ways to be virtually community engaged (VCE) in many places across the globe. This is the space to raise everyone’s knowledge and awareness of the many creative and successful ways to be virtually community engaged in a global context.

The 2020 & 2021 high school graduating cohorts: how to keep them on a college track

One devastating and potentially generational impact of Covid-19 in 2020 and probably in 2021 is the low rate of high school completion. This is especially glaring for lower income communities that switched to remote learning since March, facing multiple, overlapping, and unequal barriers to continued academic engagement. Many of these students have become difficult to keep in touch with, difficult to assist with completing high school graduation requirements, and difficult to complete the college application processes. This is the space to tell your story of what you and your fellow students have been doing in this vital 2021 area of community engagement. What have you learned, what success stories (or failure stories) need to be shared and learned from, and how do we need to adapt to deal better with these matters in the future?

Keeping democracy alive after the Presidential election drama

The 2020 election and its fallout in 2021 have tested the very foundation of American democracy, and the transition of power in the Whitehouse does not instantly provide a space for bringing the country’s divided people together around principles of justice and equal rights to all who live here. This is the space for you to share your ideas and actions that you feel compelled to carry into 2021 and beyond. Have you started a new group, platform, activist campaign, reaching out to legislators, community engagement project? Tell us in this virtual space about how you are an active participant in American democracy following the 2020 election of Joe Biden.

Focusing back on climate change and climate justice under a Biden Administration

The Biden Plan for a Clean Energy Revolution and Environmental Justice is a marked change from the Trump Administration’s policy rollbacks and legal battles to remove safeguards that were enacted since 2016, including the two Administrations’ differing views of the Paris Climate Agreement. Scientists have given countries until 2050 at the absolute latest to take measures that will halt a global temperature rise at 2 degrees or less, preferably 1.5 degrees. This is the space to tell your story of activism and involvement, to call on others to join your efforts, to make a pitch for a commitment to environmental justice of your peers and of your community.

Some funny stories to emerge from struggle

We want to bring a little humor to the conference, to sprinkle a little laughter throughout the day. So this is your opportunity to tell a story or share an experience that emerged during the time of Covid-19, one that has a funny edge to it. Or maybe you have something funny to share as you look ahead to the future and the impact that a year of social distancing and mask wearing is having on society. Maybe you think virtual community engagement itself is a joke! Step up, and help to bring a smile to your peers and friends, both old and new.